Replit

Collaborative in-browser IDE

Product Designer at Replit

Location
Remote
Job Type
Full-time
Experience
3+ years
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About the role

Despite incremental improvements, programming today has functioned the same way for almost 50 years. We're looking for contrarian designer-coders to shake up our stagnant industry. As a Product Designer on our team, you'll have a chance to rethink how millions of coders think about and interact with programming environments.

Note that the listed qualifications are mere approximations. If you're a talented hacker but don't really fit the requirements then get in touch anyway.

In this role, you will:

  • Create frameworks and systems that are adaptable and reusable.
  • Craft sketches, flows, prototypes, and high-fidelity visuals for features.
  • Partner closely with engineering to ensure that our implementation and UX are of the highest quality.
  • Engage in participatory vision-driven design as we live and breathe our community who we engage early on in our design process.

You qualify if:

  • You use JavaScript, CSS, and HTML daily.
  • You have expert-level knowledge of user-centered design principles.
  • You have years of experience as an individual contributor on a Product Design team.
  • You routinely collaborate with other Designers, Product Engineers, and Product Managers.
  • You have a solid portfolio that displays your skills in Visual Design, Interaction, and Product Ideation.
  • You have a deep understanding of building accessible and modular designs that scale to millions of people.

Even better if:

  • Experience designing for experimental features.
  • You care deeply about computing access and equality.

Why you should join Replit

We're building a first of its kind developer platform that can be used to learn and practice programming, build and deploy applications, and share and discuss with a community of peers. We realize this is an ambitious plan, but we think it's high time someone built this. There is no good reason for the insane fragmentation in programming tools today -- someone learning to code needs to learn at least ten disjointed tools and platforms to do anything interesting with programming.